How To Organize Your Sports Collectables

If you have a lot of sports collectables, you need to find a good way to organize them. You don’t want them to just end up all over your home. You want a place to keep them where you can still enjoy them. Finding the right place for your items is important.

You have a few options when it comes to your sports collectables. You can store them in a room that no one goes in or you can display them in the living room or hall. Either way you want to make sure your items are safe and in a good place.

If you decide to put them in a storage room, make sure to find a box or two that are big enough for what you have. Make sure the box can withstand the elements in case there was a leak of some kind and the ground they were on got wet. You also want a way to get to them easily if you need to get them for some reason.

If you would like for your Sports Collectables to be on display you will need to find a nice way to do this. Think about how many you have and buy a case for them. Think about where you will put it and if there will be enough room.

Once you get the case in your home you will have to spend some time organizing everything. You can go online for some tips and figure out the best way to put everything. If you want to show off what you have, think about your favorite items and put those as the center of your display.

Make plans for how you will add new items when you get them. This might mean moving things together or buying another case. You don’t need to just stick to one case and can add another one if need be.

Once you get everything set up, take some photos to see if everything looks well together. Feel free to make some changes so everything looks the way you want it to. If you aren’t happy with it, change it around.

Having and collecting Sports Collectables is a great way to spend your time. There are a lot of things you can buy and a lot of great items to look at while you decide what you want to buy.

It would be a good idea to make sure you are able to stick to a budget when you go out looking for new things to add to your collection. That way you won’t overspend your money. That can get you into trouble.

If you want to sell any of your items, make sure you do some research on the matter. You don’t want them to go for less than they are worth. If you do some research on the matter you can see how much those items are going to and what you might expect to get for them.


The Joy People Receive From Sports Collectibles

Sports collectibles encompasses everything from sports cards, uniforms, bats, footballs, baseballs, basketballs, hockey sticks, ticket stubs and anything else remotely connect to sports in specific and in general.

Sports is a big factor in the lives of many people from coaching and bringing up their children in sports to having played sports themselves as well as watching and listening to sporting events in person, on television and on the radio.

Sporting memorabilia and sports collectibles are all about the memories and the people who were associated with the memories with you at the time. The drama of the moment and the victory your team had in that championship game is what memories are made of.

This is why millions of people share the collectibles and why some of them are worth so much money. For example a Phil Rizzuto baseball card from the 1950’s is worth $195. That is not a huge sum, but is is a far cry more than the five cents it took to buy the bubble gum with the card inside the package for the Yankees Hall of Fame shortstop.

To go a step further, the bat that Babe Ruth used to hit the first baseball out of Yankee Stadium has a value of $1.3 million. An early 1933 baseball card of Lou Gehrig, the Yankee slugger who was a contemporary of Ruth is valued at over $33,000.

Everything that is related to sports is considered collectible if enough time has passed and enough people remember the sport, the player, and the events. Again, the reason that the collectibles are remembered is because of the people remember who were in their lives at that time.

The collector has a ticket stub from a baseball game of the team where he and his father attended the games when he was a boy. People collect photos of their favorite athletes in a sport, such as Oscar Robertson or Bill Russel in basketball, Bart Starr or Frank Gifford in football, Hank Aaron or Mickey Mantle in baseball, and so on.

All of these collectible items have a market value and there are countless trade shows, trade events, card stores, online venues and catalogs that promote the buying, selling and trading of all of these items.

You can scarcely go into a flea market anywhere in the United States and not find a stand selling and trading sports cards and memorabilia. Any town in America will likely have a store or hobby shop where they have been carrying sports cards and collectibles for years.

Sports collectibles and memorabilia is a billion dollar business, and millions of Americans take part in this extravaganza. But many of the people who pursue this pastime get as much pleasure out of just collecting the items as they do in making money with it. While it is true that to do anything well, you must have a passion for it, just the memories and recollections of the events behind the items, and the people involved is the reason for the passion.

The Era Of Sports Collectibles

Sports collectibles today is a billion dollar industry, and no wonder, as our society is obsessed with sports. Each of the major sports, baseball, football and basketball attracts millions of fans each year, and other sports such as auto racing, golf and tennis support many fans as well.

When it comes to memories of sporting events, players, and stars of the past, it is the memorabilia and collectible items that millions buy, trade, sell and hoard that brings such interest to the activity.

Aside from the pleasure of collecting these items, there are many different things that are very valuable as well. For example a Phil Rizzuto baseball card from the mid 1950’s is worth nearly $200 now which is a big leap in value from the five cents it originally cost to purchase the bubble gum package where the card resided.

Today a 1933 Lou Gehrig card in its original form is worth a whopping $33,000 plus and the baseball, which was the first on that was hit out of Yankee Stadium, is worth over $200,000. By the way the player who hit that ball was Babe Ruth.

Literally everything gets collected from baseballs, footballs, hockey pucks, uniforms, basketballs, ticket stubs, shoes, socks, baseball gloves, football helmets and anything else that was used by the players and were present at the events.

There are numerous trade shows, auction events, sports card stores and events, and online venues, all of which simply fuel the fires of excitement and the pleasure of not only enjoying the hobby, but of making a profit on the buying, selling and trading of the items.

Photographs of players playing, appearing at public events, appearing with notable people and any manner of other historical note is really big. There are many photographs of major sports stars mingling with other notable personalities of their day.

As expected, whenever there is such an onslaught of popular sentiment over such a huge market as sports collectibles, there enters in the shadow of fraudulent scams designed to fleece people out of their money. Sports collectibles and sports memorabilia are no exception with fake autographs, photos, items and everything else in between.

Many high end and expensive items are put through rigorous testing and verification procedures such as holograms for autographs and DNA testing for items purported to have been used by a certain star athlete. For the most part, however, there are may items that are sold to unsuspecting hopefuls that are nowhere near being authentic, and are passed off as being genuine.

Millions of people profess that the collection of sports collectibles and memorabilia offers them enough pleasure as a hobby so that they are not worried about the money. And it is true that millions are collectors for the sheer fun of it.

And of course, everyone hopes to find that one baseball card in the stack that turns out to be worth a lot of money. However, the memories and the people who were with you when the memory was made is perhaps one of the best reasons why sports collectibles has become as popular as it has today.


The Aura of Sports Collectibles

Sports, statistics, players and memories are all a part of why sports collectibles are in such demand. If you can acquire sports cards of some of your favorite athletes from years gone by, not only will you have evidence of some of your favorite memories, you will find that they are worth some money too.

Collecting sports memorabilia can be a fun hobby, but it can also be worthwhile from a financial standpoint. As an example, a Phil Rizzuto baseball card, of the Yankees shortstop from the 1950s is worth anywhere from $125 to $190.

A 1933 DeLong card of Lou Gehrig, the Yankees slugger is worth $36,354. And the list goes on and on with baseball cards from all of the greats and not so greats being worth lots of money, and they are traded and auctioned all of the time to a very wide following of enthusiastic traders.

Items such as gloves, bats, shoes, uniforms, footballs, baseballs, basketballs, and anything of value that pertains to a team, a player or their equipment is fair game as far as the enthusiasts of the collection of sports collectibles are concerned.

Photographs of the favorite stars of the day receiving accolades, appearing with other stars, appearing with other famous people of the day and anything that brings back memories are acceptable sports memorabilia.

Actually the collection of sports artifacts and memorabilia is a billion dollar industry, and it is also a growing industry. The aspect of the scope spans five generations of sports minded collectors which has generated a robust market for everything sports.

When you find that authentic baseball cards of some of the greatest players of all time are worth millions of dollars, and the bat that Babe Ruth used to hit the first ball out of Yankee Stadium is worth $1.2 million you begin to grasp the scope of the phenomenon.

Of course when anything of this magnitude exists and the course and trend of the movement is on a constant upward path, the possibility of counterfeit infiltration sets in. And the pastime of sports collectibles has been no exception. Fakes and scams have abounded, as noted at card shows and internet scams.

With modern technology such as holograms to confirm the validity of photos and autographs, it is much more difficult to pass off originals which are worth lots of money, but with many of the less expensive items, it is buyer beware at all times.

Even with all the hype about the values of various items, with everyone hoping that the items they own will turn into a retirement plan someday, just the collection of these items are a lot of fun. The possibility of anything turning into a more valuable treasure is just icing on the cake for the serious collector.

Collecting sports memorabilia can be a very enjoyable pursuit, and hours of enjoyable searching, categorizing and trading can pass the time in a very satisfying manner. Memories are much more than just a card or a bat, they are memories of who you spent the time with when those memories were being made.

The Sports Collectibles Phenomenon

The collection of sports memorabilia has become a billion dollar industry with people collecting sports cards, sports items such as bats, balls, jerseys, caps, uniforms, ticket stubs and anything at all to do with sports.

After all sports as a spectator sport goes all the way back to the mid to late 1800s and there are plenty of items from which to form a thriving pastime of collectible objects, and in addition to create a very satisfying and worthwhile hobby.

Perhaps you have memories of collecting baseball cards in your youth, and you might wish that you still had them on hand today, as it probably would have been a profitable venture. The card of Phil Rizzuto, the Yankees All Star and Hall of Fame Shortstop of the 50’s is worth roughly $195 today.

An original 1933 card of Lou Gehrig, the Yankee slugger is worth a whopping total of some $36,000. The copy of Babe Ruth’s original copy of his contract with the Boston Red Sox recently sold for $1.2 million.

These examples show how far a hobby can go when you have over 100 plus years of enthusiastic collectors who examine and desire to own some of the millions of memorabilia and records of their favorite participants in sports. Most of the time it starts out as a hobby and then become more than just a hobby when people discover the monetary element.

The sports collectibles phenomenon has spread to all sports from baseball, football, basketball, hockey, track and field, racing, tennis, and all other sports to the extent that there are valuable collectible items by the millions that are collected, bought and sold and traded.

There are sports memorabilia conventions, fairs, booths, stores, and internet transactions by the millions. Of course, when anything this momentous occurs, the specter of illegitimacy rears its ugly head and the shadow of fraud and scams enters into the picture.

For the most part, the scam prevalence is everywhere, and the only thing a serious collector can do, is to deal with known sources and avoid the large scale “events” that are full of fraudulent items. For the more expensive types of memorabilia, there are holograms to expose fake photographs and auto graphs, and even the use of DNA is applied to objects that are said to have been used by the athlete.

There are many people who will tell you, however, that just the thrill of collecting these items makes the pastime worthwhile and that it wouldn’t matter if they never received a penny from their collected items. They will spend hours and hours of each day going over their collected items and scouring the internet for bargains and trade possibilities.

After all, if you have a Mickey Mantle Card from the early 50’s, not only does it bring back the memories of an unforgettable era, the card itself is worth thousands of dollars.

While it is not often that the average collector runs across a card like that, the memories of the people who you were with at the time are priceless.

Do you know about the national sports collection show?

Do you know about the national sports card show? This is an annual event that has always been held annually since 1980 as one of the sporting memorabilia. It is also known as the National Sports Collectors Convention is particularly held in the USA every year is the largest show ever. Since its establishment in 1980, the show has always recorded a good number of participants except the year 1999 when the event was held in Atlanta GA which was only attended by around 25000 participants. The event was held at Georgia World Congress Centre. As a matter of fact, the first show was held in Los Angeles, CA region. The event took place in Los Angeles Airport Marriott Hotel. The second event was held in 1981 at a place known as Plymouth Hilton in a region called Detroit MI. The event was held between 1982 and 1990 at the following respective regions and locations. These locations include the following regions; St Louis ,MO, Chicago, IL, Parsippany, NJ, Anaheim, CA, Dallas Forth-worth, TX, San Francisco, CA, Atlantic City, New Jersey and Chicago, IL respectively. Between these years, it is only Dallas Forth-worth and Chicago that had held the event twice but Chicago hosted the event at two different venues which are Holiday Inn O’Hare Airport (1983) and Hyatt Regency Hotel (1989).It is only Dallas that was the first region to hold the event twice in the same venue in 1986 and 1990.

national sportsIn 1991 Anaheim region held the event again at Arlington Convention Centre and managed to hit a target of over 100000 participants thus setting the NSCC record at that time. Between 1992 and 2000, the event was held in Atlanta GA, Chicago IL, Houston TX, St Louis MO, Anaheim CA, Cleveland OH, Chicago IL, Atlanta GA, and Anaheim, CA respectively. However, Atlanta, GA recorded the lowest attendance of only 25000 participants marking the lowest record in the NSCC history at that time in 1999.

The event was held again between 2000 and 2010 at various regions like Cleveland, OH,(2000) at IX Centre, Chicago, IL(2001) at Donald E Stephens Convention Centre, Atlantic City, NJ (2002) at Atlantic City Convention Centre, Cleveland, OH,(2004) at IX Centre becoming the first region to host the event three times, Chicago, IL(2005) at Donald E Stephens Convention Centre, Anaheim CA,(2006)( at Anaheim convention Centre, Cleveland, OH,(2007) at IX Centre, Chicago, IL(2008) at Donald E Stephens Convention Centre, Cleveland, OH,(2009) at IX Centre and in 2010, the event was held in Baltimore, MD at Baltimore convention Centre.

The event was also held in various locations between 2011 and 2014 such as Chicago, IL(2011) at Donald E Stephens Convention Centre, Baltimore, MD(2012) at Baltimore convention Centre, Chicago, IL(2013) at Donald E Stephens Convention Centre, and again in Cleveland, OH,(2014) at IX Centre. In 2013, Chicago made an important milestone becoming the sixth time holder of the event Cleveland region on the other hand became a region that had recorded the third highest attendance of over 43000 participants.

This year`s event was held in August and the 37th event is scheduled to be held Atlantic City at NJ convention Centre. Few booths are still available so far. The event is also planned to take place in 2017, 2018 and 2019 even though the 2020 event has not yet been announced but plans are under way to announce the venue and region for the 2020 event. It is an exclusive event take has been taking place ever since it started in 1983.